Film Storage Wars Part 1

 Does Every “Cloud” Have A Silver Lining? – With David Keener from Forever

Listen to the replay of our show http://bit.ly/1pwbZlo  

Forever_Logo

 

Often time’s people want to know about putting their Home Movies in the cloud.

On the one hand, increasingly people want one version of their home movie legacy scanned as high quality data files such as Pro Res 422 or 4444, which look amazing on our HD flat screens. But at 1 gig a minute, it is not practical for cloud storage. On the other hand, if you made a version of your home movie data files compressed small enough that you could have them in your digital locker (like our expert Phil Vigeant , senior colorist at Pro8mm says, but them on Apple TV, iphone, or smaller) as another back up to your analog originals, hard drive or DVD’s that would be fantastic!

Private cloud storage is an awesome solution to have all our photos, films, documents, and memorabilia in one secure place on the internet. Unlike drop box, icloud or other servers that have been plagued with hacking, lost files and other security issues, now you can share your memories with privacy for an affordable price and know that it will be there forever – literally.

Meet Forever the worlds only Permanent Online Storage Service – preserved for your lifetime plus 100 years. It is different from other cloud storage away from prying eyes and never mined for personal information.

 

David Keener  - Forever

David Keener – Forever

Listen to our podcast and learn from V.P. Dave Keener ,Vice President of Business Development at Forever, Inc. where he brings over 20 years of entrepreneurial experience and leadership in technology, sales and business development to the FOREVER Team.

 

If you have questions about how to compress your home movies transferred in

beautiful 1080 or 2K email me, Rhonda@homemovielegacy.com

 

Check them out at www.forever.com

FACE BOOK https://www.facebook.com/Forever

Meet The Logmar Camera Team

Listen To My Interview with the team:

http://bit.ly/UQYBwX

“This is a crazy idea but it is a challenge”, says Lasse and Tommy Madsen in reference to the labor of love between a father/son camera design team. In 2009 they launched Logmar Camera Solutions of Denmark , deciding that they would like to work to create some kind of tech project they could work on together.

 

Father and son team who designed the new LOGMAR Super 8 Camera

Father and son team who designed the new LOGMAR Super 8 Camera

Tommy, a mechanical engineer who is soon to retire from is long career and Lasse , an electrical engineer started, like most companies in their garage.Their early projects center around taking the Russian Krasnagorsky 16mm wind-up camera drop in replacement board for that. The first brand new Super 8 film camera to come onto the market in over 30 years, the LOGMAR is equipped with features long absent or never available from legacy Super 8 film equipment.

Logmar Camera Solutions, the company behind this new Super-8 camera advances the use of the format to solve problems that have gone unaddressed in this genre of filmmaking, while adding innovative features that have long been on Super 8 filmmakers wish list. Innovative features include pin regitration that corrects horizontal/vertical motion jitter, and random image defocus . Additionally, the capacity to create sync sound in camera and have a larger film capacity option have also been included.

The Logmar Super 8 camera features include:

  • Pin registration & dedicated pressure plate
  • Crystal synchronized frame rates from 6fps to 48fps
  • Stereo audio recording on SD-CARD as well as true XLR 48V Phantom power.
  • WiFi remote control via iPad, iPhone or Android
  • Digital viewfinder with low light CCD sensor and video output for external monitor
  • Programmable “Function button” for: Phase Advance, Alternate speed, Rule of thirds grid etc.
  • Firmware upgradable (future proof) via standard USB connector.
  • 200ft custom reloadable cartridge option

This is a game changer for anyone who loves shooting analog film, especially Super 8 Film ! For more information on the LOGMAR Super 8 Camera, or the Beta Test Program , email info@pro8mm.com.  Pro8mm will be the exclusive North America distributors of the LOGMAR camera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legacy and Legends: What We Learned From Elvis About Creating A Home Movie Legacy That Lives!

 Listen To The Podcast 

What we can learn from Elvis about creating a Home Movie LEgacy  that lives!

What we can learn from Elvis about creating a Home Movie LEgacy that lives!

Have you ever been to Graceland? I must admit, it was never on my bucket list of things I had to see, but how can you be in Memphis and not stop by for a peek? After all, no matter if you are a fan of Elvis Presley or not, you cannot dispute the talent of the man, or incredible body of work he was responsible for creating.

Our Southern tour included giving a workshop on Home Movie Archiving in New Orleans to rescue some water damaged film, a visit to the amazing archives at The Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, with a stop at Gus’s Fried Chicken, a visit to Birmingham to the Civil Rights Museum and the church where the tragic 1964 shooting of 3 little girls shot and The Watson’s Go To Birmingham was Filmed (my company Pro8mm worked on the recreated Super 8 Film scenes for the Hallmark Hall of Fame Movie,) and of course, a stop at where Martin Luther King was shot outside the Lorraine Hotel and Sun Studios in Memphis to see and feel the intimacy of this legendary studio where Elvis recorded, and scenes of the John Mellencamp film “It’s About You” were shot – done exclusive with our Pro8mm film, processing and scanning , shot by filmmaker Kurt Markus. Graceland was not on the itinerary.

As we arrived, very early in the morning to have a jumpstart on the heat and the crowds and caught that first glimpse through the gates at this larger than life tribute to the work of one person, I realized that gift shops and tourist junk aside, that what Graceland was really about was giving total access to a families archival and legacy material. On par with Presidential Libraries, this was an archive built in and around his home, where the family and the Elvis Presley Foundation gets to decide and create how the “Kings’ Legacy will be kept alive. By creating an experience through dozens of displays, showcasing everything from Gold Records, Movie Posters, Jumpsuits, photos, and home movies as well as cars, jewelry and other memorabilia, that by the time we leave we feel an intimate connection to someone we already thought we knew well.

Many years ago we had transferred some home movies for the Presley family, and have seen many private home movie collections with Elvis footage that they captured during his personal appearances. What an enormous thrill for me it was to see this footage playing at different places throughout the estate.

 

So what can we learn from this? The lesson is really quite simple. We want to create a microcosm of Graceland to honor our own family. We want to find other people who might have footage about our loved ones. We want to have an “open archive” so that our families, descendants and even the public know about the contributions our loved ones made to the community, family, church, military or business. This is the living legacy we leave , and the benefit is that it puts an end to Suspicious Minds.

For more radio shows and information , go to www.homemovielegacy.com 

Season 1: Listen to any of our 54 past shows in iTunes! Subscribe to the podcast!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RELAUNCH OF THE HOME MOVIE LEGACY PROJECT RADIO SHOW:

EXPOSING “REEL” INSPIRATION TO CREATE A MEDIA LEGACY THAT LIVES! – ON ROCKSTAR WORLDWIDE, PRODUCED BY THE DOUBLEWIDE RADIO NETWORK Double Wide Network

 

Listen to our Radio Show Live Thursday at 4 PST/7EST

Listen to our Radio Show Live Thursday at 4 PST/7EST

I remember it was in the fall of 2012 after I published my book Get Reel About Your Home Movie Legacy Before It’s Too Late! that I got serious about developing a platform to share my message and passion about home movies, why they are important, how they can help you heal or understand your family better, and ofcourse, teach the crucial part of archiving, preservation and how to bring these films into your digital life.

After 30 years of working in the entertainment industry on Hollywood blockbusters such as Argo, Super 8, JFK that had home movie flashbacks in them and TV shows such as American Idol, VH-1 Behind The Music, I saw that the home movie archiving part of our business was growing. Celebs, the Hollywood “A” list and industry people really wanted to take care of their personal media the same way they took care of their professional media. I wanted more than anything to teach the masses to do the same.

Upon the urging of my marketing coach Craig Duswalt I was convinced that a weekly radio show was a great and powerful way to reach the masses. After just one show, I was hooked, and after a year we were reaching 10,000 people a month who wanted to learn not just about the “how” but the “why” – why you want
To bring these films from the past into the present so they will be there for the future.

We have over 50 shows in our iTunes library, and will be adding a new show each week.

Tune in live Thursdays at 4:00 PM. Call and be part of the show 480-945-0442
Download the App

 listen to the stream

Welcome to the First Home Movie Legacy Newsletter

default_headerWelcome to the First Home Movie Legacy Newsletter!

Home movies are our national treasure. They are time machines that capture the stories of our lives as individuals, families and as a people with a shared history and culture. The home movie camera has recorded the annals of our lives and those of our ancestors. There are millions of feet of 16mm, 8mm and super 8mm film (and many thousands of hours of video tapes). There are big stories to tell about the people, who they were, what they did and where they traveled. You can peek in and see the preface to the story on almost every reel. These frames are meant to delight audiences large and small! It’s all up to you and your imagination.

Weather you’re a filmmaker looking at new ways to create a compelling story using found footage, a family memory keeper, archivist or historian Home Movie Legacy want to be your GO TO resource for moving old media into your digital life. Our expertise comes from running Pro8mm, a company that has specialized in the scanning of these film and video formats for over 40 years for moguls and the masses. We can help you tell your story! 

The mission of Home Movie Legacy is to offer resources, information and inspiration to families and filmmakers to tell compelling stories with legacy footage. Weather you want to learn about cool things you could and should do with your home movies, organize, digitize or monetize all those formats, or a filmmaker wanting to make a documentary from a story inspired from archival reels, we are here to help!
– Rhonda Vigeant 

Email me Rhonda@homemovielegacy.com I’m here to help!

Les Brown Interviews Rhonda About Home Movies

Les Brown, world famous motivational speaker interviews Rhonda Vigeant about the importance of home movies and best practices to archive, preserve and bring them into your digital life! 

Click the picture to watch the video! 

watch video

Out of the Archives: The History of the Eagles

Our company, Pro8mm is so grateful that we get to have a hand in preserving the legacy of so much material that has shaped American culture! It has been about four years since we first had reels and reels of home movies from The Eagles brought in to be scanned on our Millennium II HD scanner. Now, the finished film is a Sundance 2013 winner, has been on Showtime, and is available to purchase or download!

“NEVER BEFORE SEEN” is the catch phase I love when a new documentary comes on the scene! See home movies shot on the tour bus. A story of the 1970’s. A story of an American band and music in Southern California! A rare glimpse behind the scenes of a very private band! Time to tell their story while the past 40 years were still fresh in their mind the band proclaims!

Purchase  the DVD

Click the picture to watch the video!

watch video

Radio Buzzz … The Home Movie Legacy Project


Listen From Our Show Page

Listen From Our Website and Watch Related Videos

Subscribe in iTunes


Our weekly podcast is on fire! The Home Movie Legacy Project: Exposing “REEL” solutions to create a media legacy that lives! We interview “reel” people telling their stories as well as experts who will give you fantastic tips on how to organize, digitize, share on social media and even monetize your legacy footage!

Live!! Every Wednesday at 4 PST, 7 EST. Log in or call to be part of the conversation 866-404-6519

We already have 13 shows you can download for your listening pleasure! From compelling stories of things discovered in peoples archive, to how to sell your stuff as stock footage, have a successful crowd funding campaign, photo organizing, keeping the analog arts alive, a journey is self discovery and transformation from Viet Nam, stories of Mental Illness, and the popular Kemp Family; community filmmaking and how and why a famous ASC Cinematographer recreates “home movies” for his major TV movies and so much more. Each show wraps with a tech talk featuring Phil Vigeant who expertly helps you to sort out format challenges in moving your old material into your digital life!

Coming Attractions For April You Won’t Want to Miss:

April 10: The Story of Amen Ra: When My Sorrow Died – with Matt Huffman

April 17: Your Film and Photos For Outside The Box Marketing – Craig Duswalt

April 24: As I Knew Him….My Dad, Rod Serling – with Anne Serlin

Subscribe in iTunes. Give us a review. Do you have a story or expertise to share with our audience? Email me Rhonda@homemovielegacy.com

Rhonda’s Book Launch, Get ‘REEL” About Your Home Movie Legacy…Before It’s Too Late!

We had a great book launch in Burbank, along with a drawing for a free home movie transfer. Get some “reel ” inspiration on how to be head of your own studio and DO SOMETHING with your family films. 

Purchase The Book at a Discount from my websiteBuy From Amazon 

 

 

(with editor Heidi Clingen)             (Rhonda autographing books)

Tech Talk: Beyond the DVD

WHY YOU SHOULD NOT TRANSFER YOUR HOME MOVIES TO DVD 

As a person passionate about raising the consciousness about why home movies are so important and wanting to share with people what I have learned, I can’t help but think about how much information there is on the internet from transfer houses about preservation and archiving your home movies that is not entirely correct. First and foremost is that a DVD does NOT preserve your film. A DVD is only a copy of your original film master by which you can easily watch your home movies. The quality of a DVD is far inferior to what is on your original film. You cannot easily edit a DVD transfer. More and more people understand that they can share their films in so many fabulous ways when they are properly encoded as computer files, put on a hard drive that you can then plug into your computer. You can edit them and make compelling little stories by theme, upload clips on FaceBook, have a family YouTube Channel, download them to your iPad, and so much more. Watch this video and learn more about this topic. Email me with your questions or comments! Rhonda@homemovielegacy.com

Why you don’t want to transfer your home movies to DVD

Upcoming Events: APPO Conference

Rhonda will be speaking and have a booth at the APPO Conference (Association of Personal Photo Organizers) in Chicago, Friday, April 12 on 5 Cool Things You Could and Should Do With Your Home Movies.

Picture Perfect Profits

 

The “REEL” Truth About Transferring Home Movies To DVD

A DVD is just too unstable for your precious home movies

One of the things that most people don’t consider or understand about having all their home movie media on film and tape transffered to a DVD is that they have done nothing to preserve their legacy for future generations.  While DVD’s are a convenient play back format, transferring  original material to a DVD is just making  a low quality copy from your master.  Even “GOLD” DVD’s are just a marketing scheme and are not infinitely  more stable than any other type of DVD.

4gig of Home Movies

Most people are surpirsed when I tell them  DVD is a low quality copy of their original.  It is like you had an original Picasso  painting for example.  But instead of framing your Picasso, you took a photocopy on your home photocopier, framed it, hung it on the wall, and rolled up the original or even worse, through it away.  The copy will never be as good or as detailed  in this example, because that is the quality that the photcopier can render. It is a watered down versio no f the original.  Get it? It is the exact same with your film and tapes.

 

 

A DVD will not be the common playback format of the future.  We have already lived through the demise of film projectors, VHS players, etc, and the future obsolescence of DVD is inevitable.

Another thing people often don’t think about is that you  can not easily edit a DVD.   One of the things people often feel anxious about before they transfer their films is getting things in the correct chronological order.  This is a

challenge, because unless the date and event is written on the reel or tape , we might not know what is on it, and we no longer have the correct playback machine for that kind of film and tape.

 

Today, most computers have easy to use editing programs where you can cut and paste snippets or “golden nuggets” together to tell a compelling story.  These tools make it so easy and fun to be “head of your own studio” so you can bring the past into your digital life and share on social media, create a YouTube Channel , watch on your iPad or any smart device.  Try doing that with a  DVD.  After all, editing is why people love watching a good movie.  Take out the slow, boring and blurry parts so we can focus into the good parts.

 

A couple of years ago, my aunt and uncle “downsized” from their family home to a condo complex for seniors.   Proudly, my uncle showed me his new media center beautifully built into a bookcase.  He had always been an audio and media buff and bought the best of the best.  In this cabinet he had a player for Mini-dv tapes, a Hi-8 tape player, a VHS player, a DVD player and a Blu-ray disk player – all top of the line, all brand new. He said, “I’m so glad you put all of Papa’s films on DVD a few years ago.  There would be no room for a projector!”

 

I looked at him and complimented him on the beautiful new equipment.  Then I shared with him the information below, which made his jaw drop!

 

 

HAIL TO THE HARD DRIVE – EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING

 

Today, the hard drive changes it all.  We can migrate all our home movie media onto a portable hard drive.  The price of the drives keeps going down, and the storage capacity keeps going up.

 

This can be a challenging concept to get across to people, even really smart people like my uncle.  The hard drive has eliminated our need to have so many machines to playback our media on.

 

The process that accomplishes this migration of many formats onto a hard drive is accomplished is actually quite simple. The benefit is that now all your different mediums are speaking the same language!

 

 

HOW IT’S DONE

 

In order to properly archive and preserve your home movie you have to create a  Digital Master.  This allows you to repurpose the material in many fantastic ways.  The process  by which this is  accomplished  so that  all your formats are on one device and speaking the same language is actually quite simple.

 

  • All your different formats are transferred as data files by a company offering that service.
  • Then, these new files are downloaded by that service provider  onto the hard drive.
  • The hard drive is plugged in to your computer.
  • The files show up on the device as play lists. One file for each reel of film or videotape.
  • Simply click on the one you want to watch.
  • Files can be downloaded to your computer or uploaded to the Internet. You can watch the files on any of our modern playback devices, including our TV, ipad, or smart phone or streamed over the internet.

 

The conversion to data files  should be done by a company that specializes in this type of work and  uses state of the art HD equipment that does not compromise the integrity of the original material .  Sadly, lots of companies, both big box and mom and pops are doing work on terrible equipment that can potentially damage you film.  You also want to make sure the files are HD files  (commonly referredto as a CODEC) such as Pro Res , not low quality FTP files.  If they files are small enough that they can be emailed to you, than the quality is low enough that it is inferior  to what the original material looked like.

 

 

As consumers, we are getting used to the idea that we will probably get a new computer or cell phone every few years.  We have the mindset of, “I’m getting the latest version and keeping up with technology.”

 

This is also true of hard drives.  The price of the drives keeps going down and storage capacity goes up. Migrating your media that is already in a data file format to another hard drive every few years is fast, cheap and easy; just the cost of another drive. There is no loss in quality when you migrate the data digitally from one drive to another because you are keeping it in the same form, and you will never have to re-transfer the material.  That is a crucial point.

 

For more tips like these, check out my website www.homemovielegacy.com  Rhonda Vigeant

Show #4 Home Movies as Stock Footage: Secrets Revealed (Jan. 30)

Show #4 Home Movies as Stock Footage: Secrets Revealed (Jan. 30)

Guest: Abraham Raphael, The Archivist

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN! http://bit.ly/WAIS2J

Free Give Away:  Add Your email address on our home page and get a FREE ARCICLE just for our listeners , written by Rhonda Vigeant on Home Movies as Stock Footage!  

Click Here to Join Home Movie Legacy!

gettyEvery home movie library has clips in it that someone might want for something. It doesn’t matter whether your home movies were shot on the farm or in the city, have famous people in them or home town happenings, capture the industrial world or the arts, foreign travel, Americana, or faces and places of the here and now (that were the there and then!)  The older the material gets, the more valuable it becomes.

This show was a fascinating and lively discussion about Home Movies as stock footage.  Our expert guest, Abraham Raphael, owner of The Archivist www.thearchivist.com shared his expertise on why there is a need for new content contributors, how to get your clips into a stock footage library, what types of releases are needed, how to monetize on the sale of stock footage and ethical considerations.

vw logo high

During the show we received a call from “Eleanor” who shared her story about how her engagement footage from over 50 years ago was sold to Volkswagen in a campaign called  “Smiles”, and then sold again to Discovery Channel.  She shared how she felt selling the footage commercially honored her family legacy in a different, yet significant way.

 

Phil Vigeant wrapped the show with our weekly “Tech Talk “; discussing practical technical choices the content contributor needs to make when having their film professionally scanned to increase their chances of someone wanting to buy a clip.

Abe

Bio of our Guest: Abraham Raphael is a veteran cameraman and segment producer within the film and television industry. He has worked at Sony Pictures Entertainment as a segment producer doing featurettes on such films as Monster House, Beowulf, Surf’s Up and Open Season. He has been a union cameraman for Hallmark Films and KCET.

 

 

170px-Jackie_Robinson_No5_comic_book_cover

Abraham’s unique interest in history emerged from his research into his owngrandfather’s death on the beaches of Normandy in World War II. In 2011 this research would eventually culminate in the return of looted art stolen during the war from German museums and was a national news story. The combination of his film and historical interests would lead to the development of thearchivist.com, a website whose main purpose is to comb through home movies in search of historical stock footage. His unique expertise in identifying historical stock footage has led to sales with every major Hollywood studio and production companies the world over. Some of these shots include never beforeseen footage of Jackie Robinson, Shirley Temple, Richard Nixon, David Ben-Gurion, and many other notable personalities. Shots from the collection have recently appeared on the Dr. Phil show, Oprah, and for various commercials that seek to elicit nostalgia.

For More About the Radio Show, HOME MOVIE LEGACY PROJECT, visit www.homemovielegacy.com

Tips You Want To Know About Water Damaged Film

As my heart and thoughts are with my family, friends and everyone living on the Eastern seaboard doing battle with mother nature and the eye of storm –  Hurricane Sandy, I was thinking what can I offer to you in terms of advice about protecting your home movie legacy from Mother Nature?

I was thinking about all the film that has been lost or damaged by storm, fire and natural disaster.  After Hurricane Katrina, people were calling us for advice and help with their film  legacy that got wet.  Some waited too long.  The film dried out and became stuck together like a hockey puck!

This morning I did some research to see what some of the preservation experts suggest, and I found this wonderful article on the website of The Association of Moving Image Archivists, an organization that I hold in high regard. 

This article was written by Mick Newnham, a senior researcher for the Preservation and Technical Services Branch of the National Film and Sound Archive of the Australian Film Commission.

 

FAQ On Film Water Damage

 

_______________________________________________________________________________

How does getting wet affect film?

Film that has been immersed in water is in severe danger of having the base separate from the emulsion. This means that the part of the film with the image on it will come away from the plastic backing that gives the film its shape. The film is also at risk of being contaminated by mold growth and debris from flood water.

_______________

Why do I need to keep my films cool?

The most important factors in determining whether or not a flooded roll of film will survive are the total time it has been wet and the temperature at which it has been kept. The warmer the conditions, the shorter the time frame.

_______________

How much time do I have before films that have gotten wet are unrecoverable?

This depends on so many factors, it is impossible to say for any particular reel of film. Without question, the sooner you can get the film into the hands of recovery professionals, the better. But even if a lot of time passes before you are able to start the recovery process, if the film is valuable to you, it is worth trying to salvage it. You might at least be able to save part of the film.

_______________

Why should I store films that have gotten wet underwater? Doesn’t it make more sense to dry them off?

You should not try to dry the films! The reason for storing the films underwater is to prevent them from drying in the air. If films get wet and are not dried in a special way, the emulsion (image) from one layer can stick to the base (plastic backing) of the next layer. This is known as “blocking.” If a film develops blocking it cannot be unwound without damage.

_______________

When my films are stored in water, will I see any changes in them?

You probably will notice changes. First, the film will probably change color slightly. Sometimes it develops a purplish or blue color after a few days. This is normal and does not indicate any problems.

After a few more days, the film will become very slippery. This happens because the gelatin at the edges of the film is starting to dissolve and because bacteria and molds are active. This is a warning sign. The film may still be salvaged fairly intact at this point, but it needs to be taken to a lab as soon as possible.

“Threads” or filaments may start to appear on the film. These are thin sections of emulsion floating away from the film base. This is not a good sign. The emulsion may not withstand rewashing intact. Take the film to a lab as soon as possible.

“Gray soup,” nasty, gooey, slimy water: the emulsion is decomposing and the film will not withstand any treatments. However, some frames may still be able to be seen and duplicated as still images. So even in this extreme case, you may still want to take the film to a lab to see what images can be salvaged.

_______________

What happens if my films got wet, then dried out again before I could put them in water?

When a film becomes wet and then dries completely, there are two levels of damage that may occur. With luck, the damage to your films will not be too severe. Even if you are less fortunate, it may still be possible to save parts of your films.

If you are lucky, all that will happen is that the emulsion surface will become very shiny and smooth, especially around high density areas (where more dye or silver is congregated). This may occur in patches and will result in some noticeable artifacts (flaws) when the film is projected or copied.

In worse conditions, more serious damage, called “blocking,” may occur. When the film dries out, the gelatin emulsion will adhere via crosslinking to the backing layer of the adjacent wrap of film. This is a very strong adhesion, so strong that the emulstion will tear internally and some of the emulsion will remain adhered to the base where it should be and the rest will adhere to the other layer of film. It may also tear from the film base, so that chunks of

emulsion will be removed and stuck to the adjacent film layer. Or the whole film will tear. Any attempt to unwind a blocked film will result in damage to the film.

While a blocked film cannot be unwound without damage, it is possible to carry out highly specialized conservation treatments that may enable the film to be unwound. These treatments carry a degree of risk, especially if the film has been wet for any length of time before drying out. The treatments are time- consuming and expensive. Unblocking treatments should be thought of as a last resort for attempting to save films that are very important to you.

Post a question on this website if you would like to ask for more information about unblocking films or other film recovery topics. A recovery expert will answer on the website promptly.

Source http://www.amianet.org/resources/guides/Resource_FAQ_on_Film_Water_Damage.pdf

If you have any questions, or your film does get wet, please email  or call me so we can help you to make sure it is properly dried out by a professional lab!

Rhonda@homemovielegqacy.com   818-848-5522


Blog Post  © Rhonda Vigeant 2012

Mold of Super 8 Film That Got Wet

This is what mold growing on film looks like when your reels get wet. This will accelerate the deterioration of your reels!

 

GET “REEL” About Your Home Movie Legacy Before It’s Too Late!

 

There is no time like the present to look at the past! (still photo created in native 1080 HD off my super 8 film by Pro8mm    www.pro8mm.com

 
Me and my mom – 1962      © 7/12 Pro8mm  Rhonda Vigeant

Everyday I see the relief in my client’s faces when they walk into my studio with their shoebox full of films.  The stories are more similar than they are different.  They tell me that these films were shot by their grandfather, aunt and uncle, or parents. They have been thinking about scanning them for a long time.  Some clients had them converted once before to VHS or DVD and they were disappointed with the quality. “These are important to me. Can you help?”

The fact is people should be worried about their home movies.  Most want to do something with their growing and ageing collection of film and tapes, but they do not know where to begin.  We are in a digital dilemma about our growing personal libraries and it can be a daunting task to digitize, organize, and share the material. Technology is changing so fast.  We worry that we will spend money to put our home movies on yet another format that we can’t playback.  So we wait.  We lack the motivation or call to action to do something  – until we have to.

My message is GET  “REEL” About Your Home Movie Legacy Before It’s Too Late!  Too late to save the material which is in a constant state of deterioration. Too late to get oral histories from the people who can tell you who is in the films and the “reel story” on the reel! Too late because your original film master was scratched or damaged from being projected too many times or transferred improperly. Too late because you were not ready when you needed the material for an important event. Too late to use the material as physical evidence for things that may happen in life.

(how will they know what the family did in the 1940s?

Technology has given us many options and choices beyond putting your analog home movies on a DVD (passive choice).  You want to “do something”  (active choice) with the material so that the family legacy will live!

Here are some great tips of things to think about just to get the ball rolling!

1.  Vision:  What is your vision for the project?  Do you want to just see it, share it, edit it, sell it as stock footage, have it on the Internet, or use it in genealogy research? This will dictate the type of workflow and play back you choose.

2.  Preservation: Just like photos, home movies matter. There are 3,600 still images on a 50-foot reel of super 8 film! They are not just some old home movies! They are part of our family assets, and help our legacy live for future generations. The original material needs to be protected and preserved with integrity, and should only by handled by people trained in working with original material on equipment designed specifically for digitizing media. Make sure the handler has experience is assessing the condition of the film and is working with equipment that will not further damage the material.

3.  No Spoilers: Some of my clients want to see what they have before they scan it.  It is difficult to get access to good projectors and tape players. Additionally, each time you project ageing film, it runs the risk of being scratched or damaged. The perforations of the film shrink over time and often do not line up in the projector properly. Our recommendation is to scan everything. (except commercially produced films) Because you are dealing with original material there are generally no copies, and it is worth it to have a back up. I have seen Mother Nature or fire destroy entire film and video libraries and if there was no back up, it is a devastating loss. Sometimes there is a single golden nugget on the reel that makes it a compelling part of the library. A back of everything gives you peace of mind.

4. Money Matters:    As in most things in life, you get what you pay for and there are lots of places that transfer film very low quality, very inexpensively, and compromise the integrity of the material. Big Box stores have been known to send archives out of the country and do the transfer in an automated “factory style”.  How much would it be worth to you to have films and tapes scanned to the same quality as the original material looked – or even improved? A great option is setting a budget and doing a little at a time best quality by a professional company that specializes in this work.  This is a fantastic way to get the library done. Set a time line.  Increasingly, I see people scan one roll best quality, put it on the internet for family members to see and use a use a Crowd Funding Website such ad www.kickstarter.com to get family members to help pay for the project.  Seeing that one roll really gets people excited and they can donate directly to the project on line!

Monetize Your Home Movies as Stock Footage: There are amazing opportunities for clips to be sold as stock footage when scanned professionally (no roll bars, flickers, pixellated or ghost frames). One clip can sell for as much as it costs to scan the entire library professionally. This is a great investment opportunity for people who might be hesitant. Turning your film library into an investment might be something you would want to consider. A single clip of 8mm film on Getty Images or Pond 5 can be a revenue producer for you. You get paid a percentage each time it is sold

5.  Family Matters and  Getting Social:  There is a growing interest in Family History and Genealogy. More and more people are finding clues in their home movies to link them to their past and find out about their ancestors. These can be easily shared on the Internet via YouTube, Facebook, etc. You can add tags that researchers are looking for, and maybe find some long-lost relatives or they might find you!

6. Get Organized:  You probably have a multitude of film and video formats. If you want to do an assessment of what you have, get totes, put film in one and tapes in another.  When considering what to scan, start with having the oldest material scanned first, which will be 16mm or 8mm film. Use the information written on the boxes and cans to identify what might be on the reels. There may be a “favorite” remembered from the past.  Postage stamps on the boxes and postmarks are great clues! In the day, film was generally mailed to and from the lab.

7.  Common Film Problems: Here are a few things you can do to see if the film reels are in trouble. If they are, you may want to advise your client to get these scanned ASAP!

– Take a whiff! If you smell vinegar, the film has something called Vinegar Syndrome. This is the breakdown of the emulsion and base of the film. The film shrinks, becomes brittle and warped. It is accelerated by heat and humidity, so get the film out of the attics!

Mold can appear as white or green chalky artifacts on the film. This was caused because the film got wet or being exposed to condensation. Get the film out of basements or refrigerators!

-Cans That Are Rusted Shut. These can be carefully pried open with a screwdriver.

– A Reel Never Developed. Very expensive to have the chemistry recreated, but possible from some specialty labs such as Pro8mm or Film Rescue.

Hockey Puck Reel. This reel got completely wet and as it dried out, the base and emulsion began to separate and it is now a solid mass. Some specialty labs offer a rejuvenation process where you can have the reel soaked for up to 6 months. In some cases, the film can then be hand scanned and sometimes there may be an image on it.

Curled Film. The film has shrunk or got wet and should NOT BE PROJECTED UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES!

8. The Home Movie Transformation: There are now so many options for getting film and tape moved to digital that is has become very confusing. In simplest terms we want to advise consumers to mimic what the studios are doing with their films so that the material can be seen at it’s highest quality and repurposed in many ways. The best workflow means have the film transferred in high-definition (1080) not standard definition. This more closely matches the original resolution of the film and looks fantastic projected digitally on our modern flat screen TV’s. Film can be color corrected (like Photoshop for your film) where needed to fix fading and inconsistent lighting conditions.  Flying spot scanners have amazing dirt and scratch concealment tools.  This is a fantastic reason to get film converted my a professional company.  There are  many tools to improve the image/  Material that is encoded and put on a hard drive is ready to edit, upload, and watch on a computer, smart phone or iPad, or even your own YouTube channel and streamed over the internet.  You cannot easily edit a DVD.  A DVD is just a lower quality copy of your original material.

9. Scanners (This is the most important tip I can give you) Investigate how the work is being done and by who. There are so many places that now offer transfers, often on very primitive equipment. These are usually modified projectors that can compromise the integrity of the film. Clients only have one archive!  Hundreds of reels are destroyed every year. Would you go to an Internet site if you needed a new heart? You would certainly want to see the facility and c heck on the credentials of who is doing the work.  The same is true of your one and only archive!

Film Chain (modified projector with a video camera in it, which tapes the image. Does not have tools to improve the picture and can damage film).  This is what a majority of the transfer facilities use. Many places set these up factory style and the work is done by minimally or untrained film handlers. Can be very cheap and sometimes the work is sent out of the country.

Flying Spot Scanner (a sproketless, capstan system designed specifically for scanning). Same equipment used by the Film and TV industry. Has tools such as color correction, dirt and scratch concealment, high-resolution, framing options, speed control, and more)

10.  Next Ah-Ha:  One of the things I love most about having a home movie library encoded on a hard drive is that each reel or tape shows up as it’s own file when you plug it into your computer. You can name the files. Your entire media library is all in the same format, so the possibilities “ to do something” with the material are endless. You can then organize these into  “play lists” chronologically, or as projects, such as just weddings or just holidays!

To conclude, the challenges we have for film and video are the same as for still images. The chore of organizing, digitizing and migrating all the material into a modern workflow is big so be ready with the analog film material encoded and on a hard drive so it can be added to your books! It will give you an edge. Educating yourself about best practices for working with home movies raises the bar and elevates our commitment as a society to elevate how important and priceless these film treasurers are.  Get your family  people passionate about helping  your family film  legacy to live!

Rhonda Vigeant is  Director of Marketing at Pro8mm in Burbank, CA and has worked with home movies and legacy footage for 30 years. She is the author of the soon to be released book  GET “REEL” ABOUT YOUR HOME MOVIE LEGACY… BEFORE It’s TOO LATE!