Tag Archive for Rhonda Vigeant

RELAUNCH OF THE HOME MOVIE LEGACY PROJECT RADIO SHOW:

EXPOSING “REEL” INSPIRATION TO CREATE A MEDIA LEGACY THAT LIVES! – ON ROCKSTAR WORLDWIDE, PRODUCED BY THE DOUBLEWIDE RADIO NETWORK Double Wide Network

 

Listen to our Radio Show Live Thursday at 4 PST/7EST

Listen to our Radio Show Live Thursday at 4 PST/7EST

I remember it was in the fall of 2012 after I published my book Get Reel About Your Home Movie Legacy Before It’s Too Late! that I got serious about developing a platform to share my message and passion about home movies, why they are important, how they can help you heal or understand your family better, and ofcourse, teach the crucial part of archiving, preservation and how to bring these films into your digital life.

After 30 years of working in the entertainment industry on Hollywood blockbusters such as Argo, Super 8, JFK that had home movie flashbacks in them and TV shows such as American Idol, VH-1 Behind The Music, I saw that the home movie archiving part of our business was growing. Celebs, the Hollywood “A” list and industry people really wanted to take care of their personal media the same way they took care of their professional media. I wanted more than anything to teach the masses to do the same.

Upon the urging of my marketing coach Craig Duswalt I was convinced that a weekly radio show was a great and powerful way to reach the masses. After just one show, I was hooked, and after a year we were reaching 10,000 people a month who wanted to learn not just about the “how” but the “why” – why you want
To bring these films from the past into the present so they will be there for the future.

We have over 50 shows in our iTunes library, and will be adding a new show each week.

Tune in live Thursdays at 4:00 PM. Call and be part of the show 480-945-0442
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The “REEL” Truth About Transferring Home Movies To DVD

A DVD is just too unstable for your precious home movies

One of the things that most people don’t consider or understand about having all their home movie media on film and tape transffered to a DVD is that they have done nothing to preserve their legacy for future generations.  While DVD’s are a convenient play back format, transferring  original material to a DVD is just making  a low quality copy from your master.  Even “GOLD” DVD’s are just a marketing scheme and are not infinitely  more stable than any other type of DVD.

4gig of Home Movies

Most people are surpirsed when I tell them  DVD is a low quality copy of their original.  It is like you had an original Picasso  painting for example.  But instead of framing your Picasso, you took a photocopy on your home photocopier, framed it, hung it on the wall, and rolled up the original or even worse, through it away.  The copy will never be as good or as detailed  in this example, because that is the quality that the photcopier can render. It is a watered down versio no f the original.  Get it? It is the exact same with your film and tapes.

 

 

A DVD will not be the common playback format of the future.  We have already lived through the demise of film projectors, VHS players, etc, and the future obsolescence of DVD is inevitable.

Another thing people often don’t think about is that you  can not easily edit a DVD.   One of the things people often feel anxious about before they transfer their films is getting things in the correct chronological order.  This is a

challenge, because unless the date and event is written on the reel or tape , we might not know what is on it, and we no longer have the correct playback machine for that kind of film and tape.

 

Today, most computers have easy to use editing programs where you can cut and paste snippets or “golden nuggets” together to tell a compelling story.  These tools make it so easy and fun to be “head of your own studio” so you can bring the past into your digital life and share on social media, create a YouTube Channel , watch on your iPad or any smart device.  Try doing that with a  DVD.  After all, editing is why people love watching a good movie.  Take out the slow, boring and blurry parts so we can focus into the good parts.

 

A couple of years ago, my aunt and uncle “downsized” from their family home to a condo complex for seniors.   Proudly, my uncle showed me his new media center beautifully built into a bookcase.  He had always been an audio and media buff and bought the best of the best.  In this cabinet he had a player for Mini-dv tapes, a Hi-8 tape player, a VHS player, a DVD player and a Blu-ray disk player – all top of the line, all brand new. He said, “I’m so glad you put all of Papa’s films on DVD a few years ago.  There would be no room for a projector!”

 

I looked at him and complimented him on the beautiful new equipment.  Then I shared with him the information below, which made his jaw drop!

 

 

HAIL TO THE HARD DRIVE – EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING

 

Today, the hard drive changes it all.  We can migrate all our home movie media onto a portable hard drive.  The price of the drives keeps going down, and the storage capacity keeps going up.

 

This can be a challenging concept to get across to people, even really smart people like my uncle.  The hard drive has eliminated our need to have so many machines to playback our media on.

 

The process that accomplishes this migration of many formats onto a hard drive is accomplished is actually quite simple. The benefit is that now all your different mediums are speaking the same language!

 

 

HOW IT’S DONE

 

In order to properly archive and preserve your home movie you have to create a  Digital Master.  This allows you to repurpose the material in many fantastic ways.  The process  by which this is  accomplished  so that  all your formats are on one device and speaking the same language is actually quite simple.

 

  • All your different formats are transferred as data files by a company offering that service.
  • Then, these new files are downloaded by that service provider  onto the hard drive.
  • The hard drive is plugged in to your computer.
  • The files show up on the device as play lists. One file for each reel of film or videotape.
  • Simply click on the one you want to watch.
  • Files can be downloaded to your computer or uploaded to the Internet. You can watch the files on any of our modern playback devices, including our TV, ipad, or smart phone or streamed over the internet.

 

The conversion to data files  should be done by a company that specializes in this type of work and  uses state of the art HD equipment that does not compromise the integrity of the original material .  Sadly, lots of companies, both big box and mom and pops are doing work on terrible equipment that can potentially damage you film.  You also want to make sure the files are HD files  (commonly referredto as a CODEC) such as Pro Res , not low quality FTP files.  If they files are small enough that they can be emailed to you, than the quality is low enough that it is inferior  to what the original material looked like.

 

 

As consumers, we are getting used to the idea that we will probably get a new computer or cell phone every few years.  We have the mindset of, “I’m getting the latest version and keeping up with technology.”

 

This is also true of hard drives.  The price of the drives keeps going down and storage capacity goes up. Migrating your media that is already in a data file format to another hard drive every few years is fast, cheap and easy; just the cost of another drive. There is no loss in quality when you migrate the data digitally from one drive to another because you are keeping it in the same form, and you will never have to re-transfer the material.  That is a crucial point.

 

For more tips like these, check out my website www.homemovielegacy.com  Rhonda Vigeant

Tips You Want To Know About Water Damaged Film

As my heart and thoughts are with my family, friends and everyone living on the Eastern seaboard doing battle with mother nature and the eye of storm –  Hurricane Sandy, I was thinking what can I offer to you in terms of advice about protecting your home movie legacy from Mother Nature?

I was thinking about all the film that has been lost or damaged by storm, fire and natural disaster.  After Hurricane Katrina, people were calling us for advice and help with their film  legacy that got wet.  Some waited too long.  The film dried out and became stuck together like a hockey puck!

This morning I did some research to see what some of the preservation experts suggest, and I found this wonderful article on the website of The Association of Moving Image Archivists, an organization that I hold in high regard. 

This article was written by Mick Newnham, a senior researcher for the Preservation and Technical Services Branch of the National Film and Sound Archive of the Australian Film Commission.

 

FAQ On Film Water Damage

 

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How does getting wet affect film?

Film that has been immersed in water is in severe danger of having the base separate from the emulsion. This means that the part of the film with the image on it will come away from the plastic backing that gives the film its shape. The film is also at risk of being contaminated by mold growth and debris from flood water.

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Why do I need to keep my films cool?

The most important factors in determining whether or not a flooded roll of film will survive are the total time it has been wet and the temperature at which it has been kept. The warmer the conditions, the shorter the time frame.

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How much time do I have before films that have gotten wet are unrecoverable?

This depends on so many factors, it is impossible to say for any particular reel of film. Without question, the sooner you can get the film into the hands of recovery professionals, the better. But even if a lot of time passes before you are able to start the recovery process, if the film is valuable to you, it is worth trying to salvage it. You might at least be able to save part of the film.

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Why should I store films that have gotten wet underwater? Doesn’t it make more sense to dry them off?

You should not try to dry the films! The reason for storing the films underwater is to prevent them from drying in the air. If films get wet and are not dried in a special way, the emulsion (image) from one layer can stick to the base (plastic backing) of the next layer. This is known as “blocking.” If a film develops blocking it cannot be unwound without damage.

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When my films are stored in water, will I see any changes in them?

You probably will notice changes. First, the film will probably change color slightly. Sometimes it develops a purplish or blue color after a few days. This is normal and does not indicate any problems.

After a few more days, the film will become very slippery. This happens because the gelatin at the edges of the film is starting to dissolve and because bacteria and molds are active. This is a warning sign. The film may still be salvaged fairly intact at this point, but it needs to be taken to a lab as soon as possible.

“Threads” or filaments may start to appear on the film. These are thin sections of emulsion floating away from the film base. This is not a good sign. The emulsion may not withstand rewashing intact. Take the film to a lab as soon as possible.

“Gray soup,” nasty, gooey, slimy water: the emulsion is decomposing and the film will not withstand any treatments. However, some frames may still be able to be seen and duplicated as still images. So even in this extreme case, you may still want to take the film to a lab to see what images can be salvaged.

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What happens if my films got wet, then dried out again before I could put them in water?

When a film becomes wet and then dries completely, there are two levels of damage that may occur. With luck, the damage to your films will not be too severe. Even if you are less fortunate, it may still be possible to save parts of your films.

If you are lucky, all that will happen is that the emulsion surface will become very shiny and smooth, especially around high density areas (where more dye or silver is congregated). This may occur in patches and will result in some noticeable artifacts (flaws) when the film is projected or copied.

In worse conditions, more serious damage, called “blocking,” may occur. When the film dries out, the gelatin emulsion will adhere via crosslinking to the backing layer of the adjacent wrap of film. This is a very strong adhesion, so strong that the emulstion will tear internally and some of the emulsion will remain adhered to the base where it should be and the rest will adhere to the other layer of film. It may also tear from the film base, so that chunks of

emulsion will be removed and stuck to the adjacent film layer. Or the whole film will tear. Any attempt to unwind a blocked film will result in damage to the film.

While a blocked film cannot be unwound without damage, it is possible to carry out highly specialized conservation treatments that may enable the film to be unwound. These treatments carry a degree of risk, especially if the film has been wet for any length of time before drying out. The treatments are time- consuming and expensive. Unblocking treatments should be thought of as a last resort for attempting to save films that are very important to you.

Post a question on this website if you would like to ask for more information about unblocking films or other film recovery topics. A recovery expert will answer on the website promptly.

Source http://www.amianet.org/resources/guides/Resource_FAQ_on_Film_Water_Damage.pdf

If you have any questions, or your film does get wet, please email  or call me so we can help you to make sure it is properly dried out by a professional lab!

Rhonda@homemovielegqacy.com   818-848-5522


Blog Post  © Rhonda Vigeant 2012

Mold of Super 8 Film That Got Wet

This is what mold growing on film looks like when your reels get wet. This will accelerate the deterioration of your reels!